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We all hate it when our most cherished pieces become worn out. So here are 10 tips on keeping them as good as new:

1. Handbags

If your favourite handbag is damaged or looking a bit sorry for itself, send it to The Handbag Spa who offer advanced cleaning and restoration services for luxury bags and purse brands.

2. Leather gloves

To wash your leather gloves, put them on and then wash them with lukewarm water and a mild soap solution. Pat dry with tissue paper and leave to air dry away from heat.

3. Cashmere

Having trouble with moths? It’s recommended that you always wash wool or cashmere before putting it away as moths search out the protein such as hair and skin particles, and hate cleaning fluid. But that can be impractical so it’s a good idea to invest in cedar blocks – they contain certain oils that last for a long time that moths detest. For less costly options that moths also hate: 1. try wrapping your clothes in black tissue paper and adding lavender flowers to your drawers, or 2. keep new soaps near your woollens until you need to use them; once you have, pop them back in the drawer after they’ve completely dried (or put them in a little organdie bag if you want it to look prettier).

5. Vintage

Hopefully any vintage purchase you buy has been fully cleaned. But to make sure it isn’t carrying moth eggs, freeze it or have it dry-cleaned. If a garment is damaged, make sure you take it to a specialist seamstress for restoration- I should know, I once took an original 1920s flapper dress to a reputable tailor and he promptly ripped it in half not understanding what he was dealing with. The look on my face said it all.

6. Avoid metal hangers

They’re bad for your clothes. Padded ones are great but take up a lot of room, so try rubber coated non-slip ones instead.

7. Coats

It’s only small and is something we can all easily forget in haste, but it’s a good idea to always empty the pockets after each wear to help stop it from becoming bedraggled or out of shape. Also avoid hanging it on a hook, opting for a padded hanger instead to uphold the shape of the shoulders.

8. Hats

Felt, feathers and straw collect dust over time so as pretty as hats look, leaving them out for display purposes isn’t a wise idea. The old adage that you should keep them in a hat box (stuffed with acid free paper) really is true.

9. Pilling

We all hate it when we get those little balls on our fabrics. It’s most often caused by friction so turn garments inside out before washing and even try folding or hanging them in your wardrobe that way. It was also once suggested to me to put a new wool jumper in a freezer for 24 hours but I’ve never tried it. If you have, let me know if it works!

10. Rotating your wardrobes

If you don’t have enough space in your wardrobe for your entire set of clothes, you may like to store away your out-of-season looks. When doing this, make sure you wrap your clothes in acid-free paper as it will stop colours of dyes from leeching into other garments. This is a particularly good option for storing vintage pieces.

Head over to Part 2 where we reveal the best tips on how to remove specific stains out of different fabrics (the view that ‘one method suits all’ is unfortunately a misconception) along with lots of other little handy style tips you might like to consider

We all hate it when our most cherished pieces become worn out. So here are 10 tips on keeping them as good as new:

1. Handbags

If your favourite handbag is damaged or looking a bit sorry for itself, send it to The Handbag Spa who offer advanced cleaning and restoration services for luxury bags and purse brands.

2. Leather gloves

To wash your leather gloves, put them on and then wash them with lukewarm water and a mild soap solution. Pat dry with tissue paper and leave to air dry away from heat.

3. Cashmere

Having trouble with moths? It’s recommended that you always wash wool or cashmere before putting it away as moths search out the protein such as hair and skin particles, and hate cleaning fluid. But that can be impractical so it’s a good idea to invest in cedar blocks – they contain certain oils that last for a long time that moths detest. For less costly options that moths also hate: 1. try wrapping your clothes in black tissue paper and adding lavender flowers to your drawers, or 2. keep new soaps near your woollens until you need to use them; once you have, pop them back in the drawer after they’ve completely dried (or put them in a little organdie bag if you want it to look prettier).

5. Vintage

Hopefully any vintage purchase you buy has been fully cleaned. But to make sure it isn’t carrying moth eggs, freeze it or have it dry-cleaned. If a garment is damaged, make sure you take it to a specialist seamstress for restoration- I should know, I once took an original 1920s flapper dress to a reputable tailor and he promptly ripped it in half not understanding what he was dealing with. The look on my face said it all.

6. Avoid metal hangers

They’re bad for your clothes. Padded ones are great but take up a lot of room, so try rubber coated non-slip ones instead.

7. Coats

It’s only small and is something we can all easily forget in haste, but it’s a good idea to always empty the pockets after each wear to help stop it from becoming bedraggled or out of shape. Also avoid hanging it on a hook, opting for a padded hanger instead to uphold the shape of the shoulders.

8. Hats

Felt, feathers and straw collect dust over time so as pretty as hats look, leaving them out for display purposes isn’t a wise idea. The old adage that you should keep them in a hat box (stuffed with acid free paper) really is true.

9. Pilling

We all hate it when we get those little balls on our fabrics. It’s most often caused by friction so turn garments inside out before washing and even try folding or hanging them in your wardrobe that way. It was also once suggested to me to put a new wool jumper in a freezer for 24 hours but I’ve never tried it. If you have, let me know if it works!

10. Rotating your wardrobes

If you don’t have enough space in your wardrobe for your entire set of clothes, you may like to store away your out-of-season looks. When doing this, make sure you wrap your clothes in acid-free paper as it will stop colours of dyes from leeching into other garments. This is a particularly good option for storing vintage pieces.

Head over to Part 2 where we reveal the best tips on how to remove specific stains out of different fabrics (the view that ‘one method suits all’ is unfortunately a misconception) along with lots of other little handy style tips you might like to consider

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